Boxing lesson: Delivered to your door food is all the rage

Fads and dieting almost go hand in hand with one another.

A fad diet, from Atkins to cleanses to people trying to eat right based on blood type to lose weight, tends to be cyclical in some cases or just downright classified as 15 minutes of fame, only to be tossed aside when the next latest and greatest hits the shelves or airwaves.

Everyone has been guilty of implementing some sort of fad diet they heard works wonders, whether you’re downing raw eggs Rocky style or have decided to eat Paleo, mostly foods rich in protein and only good carbs (versus Atkins and its no carbs grass roots).

But what about food that is healthy and is made to eat for those who are trying to lose weight but with one overwhelming, positive catch.

You can enjoy this food, and it’s delivered to your door.

And, here’s another catch: it’s fresh ingredients and recipes that allow you to make it and not worry about counting calories or wondering if it is healthy or not. This latest “fad” of sorts is the direct to door food boxes, such as Blue Apron and Hello Fresh, which allows you to choose a certain classification of eating types (i.e. Vegan, Vegetarian, etc.) and they’ll simply deliver the ingredients to your door for a fair price, and all you have to do is follow the recipe and magically a healthy, portion controlled dinner appears on your plate without the fuss of wondering what is good or bad food wise.

What makes the food deliver boxes so impressive is the simplicity involved in the work from box to table and that really anyone can follow it based on what you’re given to begin with from one order to the next.

Furthermore, the caliber of the food isn’t anything to scoff at or assume is low grade based on pricing and the idea that it is coming to you through the mail or a delivery service. You also can’t underestimate the time saved from grocery shopping and turning a 30 minute prep and serve dinner, while eliminating the effort put into selecting just the right ingredients that will turn any dinner from sufficient and serviceable to succulent.

You’d be hard pressed to call this a fad, even though the direct to door dinners and ingredients are in the infancy stages. A fad suggests it might not be around for a while, but you have to think this idea is one that is a game changer for good.