Cleaning Lazy: Why clean eating is filled with dirty lies

healthy eating

Fitness, eating healthy and dieting is always filled with so much misleading information, you’d be hard pressed to find a true source of sanity on the topic.

Trends and district often permeate through the fitness world, when you’re talking about a specific diet to lose weight or an exercise (or product) that is guaranteed to get rid of that “stubborn belly fat.”

From the Atkins diet craze from about 10 years ago to the South Beach Diet and everything in between that has followed suit, the average exerciser and dieter doesn’t even know where to begin.

The latest buzz words, from a diet perspective, is the term “clean eating,” something you’ll hear from online talk shows or fitness experts or even a company such as Panera Bread, who is absolutely jumping on this bandwagon to the tune of talking about all their food and what they serve in their restaurants as clean eating.

Much like most phrases and terms that are born out of exercise and diet driven discussions, “clean eating” means something different to everyone. In essence, the term centers on food that is unprocessed, minus GMO’s or anything artificially added to enhance food or beverages, such as antibiotics being fed to chickens or artificial sweeteners swimming around your favorite low calorie or no calorie drinks.

The truth is clean eating, at its purest form, means you’ve rid your body of dairy, gluten, wheat and only partake in certain types of food based on how they’re prepared or how an animal is fed. Grass fed beef or bison, antibiotic free chicken and a diet that includes gluten free bread or Ezekiel bread, dairy free foods and others of that ilk are the tent poles of eating cleanly.

Research has suggested wholeheartedly that your body was never meant to tolerate or being able to process wheat, enriched flour that you find in bread and dairy. Those who complain on stomach pains or cramps after drinking milk for example or that bloating feeling that follows one slice of bread after another is no coincidence given what we know about wheat and how the body essentially rejects it.

So if Panera, for example and not to pick on them, wants to talk about clean eating, they can’t include things such as nine grain bread, bacon that isn’t uncured or chicken noodle soup that have flour in those noodles.

That isn’t to suggest that food isn’t healthy per say, but when you talk about eating clean, food is often hard to come by that really fits that moniker properly and correctly.