Scam Artists: Why fitness fails us when fads rule

Diet Pill Fads

When you think of fitness, you rarely think about being “scammed.”
That terminology typically is reserved for the likes of identity theft or some sort of credit card fiasco or your email being hacked into and everyone you know being riddled with spam from you.

But fitness? Scams?

The truth is the fitness industry is full of artists that paint this rose colored picture of you dropping pounds instantly or magic potions, creams and powders that halt your metabolism as you supposedly watch the fat melt away with little or no effort from you.

How exactly do you spot a fitness scam?

Anything that seems too good to be true most likely is exactly just that.

Think about items like the 10 minute trainer or six minute abs, and you’ll quickly see that most of that is all talk and action on your part but very little in the way of results. That isn’t to suggest that you need to work out for hours, but putting in six to 10 minutes of actual work in the gym isn’t going to get you very far.

Supplements, in all shapes and sizes, are marketed often as miracle drugs, particularly those that call themselves “fat burners.” The supplement business is a billion dollar one, and that means you have a sprinkling of real contenders with legitimacy but mostly pretenders that are These are unsafe and unproven, and really pale in comparison to actual vitamins or other supplements that are natural or herbal. Those words, however, are used incorrectly quite a bit and customers so desperately want to feel as though they’re eating healthy and correctly that they fall for that trap.

From taking supplements at home to at home equipment, the smart money is on choosing that next exercise piece carefully, mostly steering clear of ab equipment. Everyone wants that tone, lean stomach, so manufacturers and subsequent spokesperson gravitate toward that area of the body to push equipment that promises a six pack but actually won’t ever deliver as promised.

The old adage that “abs start in the kitchen” rings true always in that eating lean, high protein, low carbohydrates, will always beat an ab coaster, lounge or swing.

The penchant for the general public to want an easy fix makes sense. Exercise is hard, and gaining weight is easy but taking it off takes hard work, dedication and eating right. Anything less than that is just fast talking, con men and women at work.