Traveling Stand: Why fitness and traveling can go hand in hand

The biggest plight that a person who travels faces is trying to find the time, the place and the energy to exercise.

If you’re someone who extensively drives, flies or travels for their job and eating well and exercising regularly is engrained into your at home life, you understand just how daunting all that can be when you’re not in the comfort of your own home.

Instead of the friendly confines of your kitchen and access to your own food, you’re left at the mercy of hotel breakfast, local restaurants and a typical gym that consists of about a third or less of the equipment you’ve become accustomed too locally.
Trying to keep that same pace is going to take a little more focus and drive and commitment on your part as you travel.

For instance, you want to stick to the same basic diet of high protein and low carbohydrate that you follow when you’re not traveling. Fast food restaurants tend to be tempting at that moment, much the same way that breakfast buffet and free coupon are as well at the hotel.

You want to avoid overeating at breakfast and stick to eggs, fruit and a small amount of carbs, such as one piece of toast or better yet oatmeal.

The fast food element works the same, grilled chicken sandwiches, salads and avoiding foods high in fat and sugar.
The exercise part might be a little more difficult given that the gyms and workout areas are minimal, but you can’t go wrong with two types of working out: cardio and circuit training. Every hotel gym has some sort of treadmill or elliptical and those can be your best friend when you’re not at liberty to do much else.

Thirty minutes of cardio will be more than enough to suffice until you get back to your regular routine. The circuit again is another product of your environment, given those machines and a few random dumbbells will be at your disposal.

Your best bet is to hit every body part as part of a circuit, and keep the weight training at a minimum, but with high reps and low weights (because that’s about all you have).

Exercise isn’t about having a large scale exercise room, group exercise classes, personal training or even eating clean when it suits the person but instead making the most of working out no matter the circumstance or where you happen to be at any given moment.

Meat Covered: Why vegetarian diets still can build muscle

healthy eating

From gluten free to vegan and everything in between, specialty diets aren’t anything new.

In fact, they’re more the norm.

The one element of a specialty diet that can cause some headaches is for the person who spends a significant amount of time in the gym, lifting weights and trying to build muscle with very little in the way of protein at their disposal, specifically for vegetarian diets.

When you can’t eat meat, you lose significant protein from chicken, steak and other protein sources that are a no no on your diet.

Or, do you?
The real question isn’t so much about losing protein but realizing where else you can find it to have diet that isn’t counter productive to building muscle in the midst of every bicep curl and chest press you do, without feeling as though all that hard work in the gym is for naught.

Protein can be found in one of the more unique places and doesn’t necessarily need to be rooted in meat.

Think about foods like nuts, legumes and tofu as just a few options for your protein needs. Edamame beans in particular are riddled with protein, nearly 30 grams per cup of protein. Some who like to stay away from soy can look into protein powders, which are abundant so you want to go with a higher grade and not a Wal Mart or store brand such as GNC specifically. You’ll want to research for a protein that is a middle of the road brand.

The trick to building muscle is protein to repair the damage that you’ve done to your muscles and to build them back up and then some, but also injecting foods high in amino acids. You’ll look to the meatless option of eggs and seeds of any variety (sunflower or pumpkin), both of which are rich in both protein and the amino acids that are equally effective in pumping up your muscles.

Dietary needs are nothing new to the masses, and as someone who can’t eat bread, dairy or gluten, and has trouble digesting red meat, you’ll be thankful that you don’t have to rely on chicken, steak and milk or dairy products to get all the protein you’ll need.

If you listen to the experts that tell you, from a digestive standpoint, that red meat for example isn’t made for your body, you’ll be glad you switched from meat to vegetarian and not miss a beat in the gym.